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10 Scary White Water Rafting Places

White water rafting has always been one of the most desired adventurous sports for those who love to play with risks. Also it a pleasing view to notice a small colorful raft tossing among the white waves of the rough water. But, if you’re a beginner just getting a taste of this sport, it is recommended that you do not attempt any of the top 10 deadliest whitewater rafting locations mentioned below. While they are beautiful, without a doubt, many professionals have perished during their attempts. Here is the list of 10 scary whitewater rafting places:

10. MICKEY’S OCOEE RIVER

MICKEY’S OCOEE RIVER
 
 

There’s a certain stretch of Mickey’s Ocoee River which sees numerous deaths every year, with two deaths happening in a single week back in 2011. While the river is not a monstrosity, and is categorized as a class III, pushing towards the next level, there’s a fork at a section of the rapid which drops people into a rocky descent down. This has injured dozens of rafters and has killed many more.

9. INGA RAPIDS, CONGO RIVER

INGA RAPIDS, CONGO RIVER
 
 

With time, many have died trying to navigate these rapids. In fact, in 2011, a freestyle kayaker and his team were the first to survive the Inga Rapids. In an interview with Steve Fisher, when asked about the difficulty of the rapids, he stated that he hadn’t managed to conquer the rapids, but rather navigate from the top to the button, and at best, to survive. He also mentioned that he had tears in his eyes at the end of the attempt.

8. DIPPER CREEK, SQUAMISH VALLEY, BRITISH COLUMBIA

DIPPER CREEK, SQUAMISH VALLEY
 
 

This incredible stretch is mostly known for its epic, yet dangerous falls alongside with the variety of tight canyons that kayakers have to navigate through. With this in mind, the section is quite risky for professional rafters and out of the question for beginners. Locals often advice people not to tackle the river as, with time, many have perished during their attempts.

7. CHERRY CREEK, UPPER TUOLUMNE, CALIFORNIA

CHERRY CREEK, UPPER TUOLUMNE
 
 

Rafters and kayakers who feel confident in tackling major drops, lots of boulders, sharp turns and undercurrents will definitely like this location. Due to the risks it poses, it is definitely one of the most difficult whitewater rivers to navigate through, as it has a total of 15 class V rapids. The section is most dangerous from mid-summer to September, as the high flows of spring water raise the speed of the river, thus making it much more dangerous to rafters.

6. CHATTOOGA RIVER, GEORGIA AND SOUTH CAROLINA

CHATTOOGA RIVER
 
 

The fourth section of the Chattooga River in Georgia is perhaps one of the best-known dangerous rapids for kayakers and rafters from all around the world. In fact, it was said that there are more legends about the five falls of the Chattooga River, then any other set of rapids worldwide. Surprisingly enough, this region is still commercially run, regardless of the fact that the section four of this river has taken many lives throughout history. Thousands of people attempt to tackle the section four of the river, and while most survive, many are injured.

5. WHIRLPOOL RAPIDS GORGE, NIAGARA RIVER, NEW YORK

WHIRLPOOL RAPIDS GORGE
 
 

When people think of New York, not many are aware of the fact that one of the world’s most dangerous white water rapids is situated there. The Niagara Gorge, which is currently off-limits to paddlers, is one of the deadliest sections of Class VI rapids. This is so mostly due to the fact that the deep rapids tend to reach speeds of over 20 mph, while also having some of the most extreme turns available at this moment in time. It’s worth pointing out that in 1976, a commercial rafting venture was attempted, which came to a stop on the 12th turn when the raft managed to flip, killing four people.

4. FUTALEUFU RIVER, CHILE

FUTALEUFU RIVER
 
 

This white-water rafting location is known by enthusiasts as not being suited for the faint of heart, as only professionals are capable of tackling the river without injury or even death. The 14-mile stretch of the Class V rapid takes a while to complete, and regions inside have quite descriptive names. These include, but are not limited to The Perfect Storm, Wall Shot and Gates of Inferno. Throughout history, numerous rafters and kayakers have lost their lives here as well. Regardless of this, it remains one of the most popular destinations for rafters, with hundreds and even thousands of people attempting to tackle the whitew-ater river every year.

3. VICTORIA FALLS, THE ZAMBEZI RIVER, ZAMBIA/ZIMBABWE

VICTORIA FALLS
 
 

Most people refer to this part of the river as the wildest one-day white water trip that anyone can take. Rafters usually begin paddling from just under the Victoria Falls, which also happens to be one of the 7 natural wonders of the world. After a bit of rafting, they’ll arrive to one of the most dangerous class V rapids anywhere in the world. Parts of this region are referred to as the Stairway to Heaven, the Devil’s Toilet Bowl and the Commercial Suicide. The names should be enough to scare most rafters away, but the most courageous ones have tried tackling the river. While most succeeded, many were injured and died during their attempt. It’s an adrenaline-packed endeavor that is still being tackled by rafters from all around the world on a daily basis.

2. CELESTIAL FALLS, WHITE RIVER, OREGON

CELESTIAL FALLS, WHITE RIVER
 
 

Oregon is well-known in the rafting community for the variety of dangerous white water rivers that it offers. One of these examples is the Celestial Falls of the White River. This particular region was extremely popular with daredevils back in the day, being a class VI rapid, mostly described by authorities as extreme. Later on, authorities decided to keep the part of the river off-limit for kayakers, due to the dangers associated with rafting. Large stones and simply violent waters have taken the lives of many people throughout the region. It’s important to point out that however, while the class VI part of the White River is closed, the upper part of it offers some great thrills as well, for both class III and IV.

1. LOCHSA RIVER

LOCHSA RIVER
 
 

The Lochsa River is situated on the longer side of the spectrum, as it includes a total of 63 rapids, which are usually graded III and above. Its etymology should be enough to keep most rafters away, as it comes from the Indian word of rough water. Technically, it is 12-mile stretch from the Indian Grave Creek over to the Wilderness Gateaway Bridge. Locals believe that most sections of the river should be attempted with extreme precaution, only by professional kayakers, who have heavy-duty equipment that they’re ready to properly use at a moment’s notice. Certain sections of the river, named Bloody Mary, Termination and Grim Reaper are ferocious even for the best rafters worldwide, yet many still attempt to tackle the waters of this river. Through time, many have failed, and reports indicate that over a dozen people died in this region, with many other being severely injured.

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